PEOPLE

Faculty

Ranu JungRanu Jung, Ph.D.

Wallace H. Coulter Eminent Scholars Chair, Professor and Chair of Biomedical Engineering, Director of Adaptive Neural Systems Laboratory
Email:
Office: (305) 348-3722

CV

Ranu Jung holds the Wallace H. Coulter Eminent Scholars Chair in Biomedical Engineering at Florida International University where she is Professor and Chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering. Previously she held faculty appointments at University of Kentucky and Arizona State University where she was founding co-director of the Arizona Board of Regents approved Center for Adaptive Neural Systems. She received her B.Tech with Distinction in Electronics & Communication Engineering from National Institute of Technology, Warangal, India and her MS and PhD degrees in Biomedical Engineering from Case Western Reserve University. With a body of published work which includes peer reviewed articles, book chapters, and conference papers she is frequently an invited speaker. Her honors include a National Research Service Award from the US National Institutes of Health, a N.E. Ohio American Heart Association fellowship, the 2002 Science and Engineering Award, Governors Certificate of Recognition from the Commonwealth of Kentucky, appointment by the Arizona Governor and Senate as Commissioner to the Arizona Biomedical Research Commission, Florida Board of Governor’s New Florida Scholar’s Boost Award and the Florida International University 2012 TopScholar award. She is an elected Senior Member of IEEE and the Society of Women Engineers and past-President of the international Organization for Computational Neurosciences, Inc. She has served on several scientific expert review panels for the US National Science Foundation and the US National Institutes of Health and advisory committees for international universities as well as Editorial Boards of several professional journals. Professor Jung’s transdisciplinary research interests are in neural engineering and computational neuroscience. She co-founded Advensys LLC, a small business R&D company. With an almost two-decade record of competitive federal funding, she has been a leader in establishing academic-clinical-industrial partnerships and is actively engaged in the development of neurotechnology that is inspired by biology, is adaptive, and could be used to promote adaptation in the nervous system to overcome neurological disability or trauma. Her current research program is funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to develop, design, and deliver novel neural interfaces to prostheses for upper limb amputees.

Kenneth HorchKenneth Horch, Ph.D.

Research Professor
Email:
Office: (305) 348-2176

CV

Broadly speaking, my research interests lie in the area of how the nervous system processes information and controls behavior. The main thrust of the work in my lab at present centers around neuroprosthetics – development of devices and methods for restoring or replacing nervous system function in handicapped individuals. The current focus of my work in this area is to develop an interface between the nervous system and prosthetic arms. This work is currently being supported by funds from NSF. In addition, I am engaged in an attempt to use magnetic fields to block peripheral nerves. If successful, this system would have various clinical uses such as in treatment of children with cerebral palsy and in hand surgery.

Liliana RinconLiliana Rincon Gonzalez, Ph.D.

Research Assistant Professor
Email:
Office: (305) 348-4782

CV

Dr. Rincon Gonzalez received her B.A. in Psychology and B.S.E., M.A., Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from Arizona State University. During her doctoral studies Liliana studied how individuals process body-posture signals in their peripersonal space. Following her graduate studies, Liliana became a Postdoctoral fellow in the Sensorimotor lab at the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour at Radboud University Nijmegen in The Netherlands. Her research focused on how individuals process motor decisions during self-motion. Currently, she is working at the ANS laboratory coordinating and managing all human subject studies.

Brian HillenBrian Hillen, Ph.D.

Research Assistant Professor
Email:
Office: (305) 348-4783

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Dr. Hillen received his BS in Bioengineering from UC San Diego and his PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Arizona State University. His research interests include motor control, biomechanics and neuroprostheses, particularly related to injury. His research has focused on changes in locomotion following spinal cord injury using experimental and computational approaches. Much of his research has been funded by the joint NSF/NIH program: Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience (CRCNS).

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Staff

Jefferson GomesJefferson L Gomes

Laboratory Manager
Email:
Office: (305) 348-4785

CV

Initially I was given the opportunity to work in a Human Anatomy lab at Sao Paulo University, in Brazil. With this opportunity, I became an expert in human dissection, and many techniques preparing body part for the medical school students. My research experience was initiate when I moved to Saint Louis, MO.  There I started working in a molecular biology laboratory at Washington University. Recently, I was given the opportunity to be part of the ANS laboratories as a Laboratory Manager at the Biomedical Engineering Department, at Florida International University.

Sathyakumar KuntaegowdanahalliSathyakumar Kuntaegowdanahalli, M.S.

Research Engineer
Email:
Office: (305) 348-4780

CV

Sathyakumar S Kuntaegowdanahalli is a Research Engineer in the Adaptive Neural Systems Laboratory (ANS) at Florida International University. He received his B.S. degree in Electronics and Instrumentation from Birla Institute of Technology and Science Pilani, India. He also has a Master’s degree in Electrical Engineering from University of Cincinnati. As part of his Master’s thesis he worked on developing microfluidic particle separators. Currently he is working on a NIH funded project to develop advanced prosthesis that can provide sensory feedback to amputees. His research interests include neural interfaces and functional electrical stimulation. When not working, Sathyakumar enjoys wildlife and landscape photography.

Anil ThotaAnil Thota

Research Engineer
Email:
Office: (305) 348-4780

CV

Anil received his B.E. in Biomedical Engineering from University College of Engineering, Osmania University, India in 1998. He received two master degrees in Biomedical Engineering, one from University of Kentucky in 2004 for his work in neuromechanical gait analysis in incomplete spinal cord injured rodents and the other from Case Western Reserve University in 2012 for his work in biomechanical assessment of Parkinsonian gait in non-human primates. As a research engineer at Cleveland Clinic Foundation (CCF) from 2006 to 2012, he collaborated in developing algorithms to assess postural stability in Parkinson's disease patients and in collegiate athletes after sports related concussions. At CCF, he also worked on projects in understanding the effects of Deep Brain Stimulation on motor control behavior in Parkinson disease patients. Currently, he is working at ANS on NIH and DARPA funded projects to develop smart prosthesis for upper limb amputees.

Kiatlyn PhilpottKaitlyn Philpott

Patent Research assistant
Biomedical Engineering
Fall 2016-Present
Email:

Kaitlyn Philpott is a senior Honors student at Florida International University. She is double majoring in Economics and English and is pursuing a Pre-Law Skills and Professional Values certificate. She is an aspiring law student with an interest in Intellectual Property and Patent Law. In the Honors College, Kaitlyn has been and remains an involved member of the Pre-Law Association Through Honors (P.A.T.H.) as the current Membership Chair and former Treasurer. She looks forward to working in the Adaptive Neural Systems Laboratory as a patent research assistant. She hopes to gain valuable experience in patent research that will be applicable to her future in the legal field.

 

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